How do you practice?

Someone noticed that I’ve learned how to practice guitar. I asked what they meant by that, and they said that I “start slow, memorize the piece, and keep practicing, a little faster each time”. That is what works for me. When it comes to learning how to become a better programmer, I’m not sure that it is so simple (not to say guitar is simple of course!).

How do you practice programming?

I’ve got some ideas on how I do it, but it I’m going to take some time to think about it.

That post is over the hills and far away!

One reason why F Sharp is exciting

One of the most common reasons cited for not learning more about functional programming is the lack of both good libraries and good development environments. This is a little bit surprising, because when it comes to learning a language, these two features are likely to have the least impact on the learning process. Despite that, this lament continues; there must be more to it!

Programmers, like most folks today, are largely short on time. Wherever they invest it, they expect a good return. When it comes to programming, every programmer hopes that the investment he makes in learning a new language has at least a fighting chance at being applied to solving a billable problem.

F# completely blows away these two huge barriers to folks learning more about functional programming: it has complete access to the .NET platform and has excellent integration with Visual Studio .NET.

This is very, very exciting: even if a programmer never ends up using a functional programming language for billing work, he will have had a lot of fun learning a new paradigm, and will be a better programmer for it!