Fractal Imaging

What is fractal imaging? Well, it’s more than just the algorithmic generation of ferns (like the generated image above) from non-linear equation systems. It’s a way of looking at ordinary (bitmap) images of all kinds. The hypothesis is that any given image (of any kind) is the end-result of iterating on some particular (unknown) system of non-linear equations, and that if one only knew what those equations are, one could regenerate the image algorithmically (from a set of equations) on demand. The implications are far-reaching. This means:

1. Instead of storing a bitmap of the image, you can just store the equations from which it can be generated. (This is often a 100-to-1 storage reduction.)
2. The image is now scale-free. That is, you can generate it at any scale — enlarge it as much as you wish — without losing fidelity. (Imagine being able to blow up an image onscreen without it becoming all blocky and pixelated.)

Kas Thomas

Here is the book, Fractal Imaging, referenced by the article.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *